Preparations


OK, time to come clean, this is the project I’ve been inspired to create from discarded pallets. We’re looking at building a decent-size covered woodshed to hold all the firewood we’ll need once our woodburner arrives. I’m sure ours won’t be anywhere near as beautiful as the woodshed in this video. particularly as I’m going to try and make ours almost entirely from reclaimed timber, keeping the costs down to just fixings and waterproofing for the roof.

 

We’ve been trying to reduce our carbon footprint in lots of ways, but I still love to travel. To try and square that circle we have stopped flying. I’ve had to get on a plane for work, but as a family we haven’t flown on holiday for nearly three years.

The great thing is, living in Britain, that there are loads of great holidays we can still have by road, rail, and sea. Some of those holidays can be a bit trickier to plan than the average package holiday, so I’ve teamed up with some good friends to share what we’ve learned. Together we have put together a site – RoadRailAndSea.co.uk – with all our experiences, and we’re adding to it all the time.

So whether you’re after a weekend in Brussels with Eurostar or – my favourite – an overnight train to Venice, we have found a range of great places to go, and you never have to wait in Airport security again . . .

cheese-waxI’ve been reading a bit more on waxing cheeses, so I thought it would be a good idea to re-invigorate this one of my early posts, It seems well preserved, but could do with some more links!

A little snippet here piqued my interest. I’m having a good think about food storage at the moment, to ensure year-round produce, and this is one of the classic methods of preservation. Not seen so much nowadays as everything is plastic-wrapped, but waxing a hard cheese allows you to keep it – unrefrigerated -for some time, possibly even years. The wax coating, when done properly, hermetically seals the cheese, preventing mould and retaining its moisture.

For more details on how to wax cheese (and why to do it), here are some great resources:

And some new links with more detail on how to coat the cheese with wax, and then how to store it:

Makes two cups
No cooking required

1 400ml can of chickpeas
1 1/2 tbsp tahini – but we use peanut butter
3+ tbsp lemon juice – to taste
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp salt
2+ tbsp olive oil
up to 1/4 cup water

And for serving

Turkish flat bread or some long-life wraps.

Recipe

Drain and rinse the chickpeas, then combine the all the ingredients in a food processor, with a stick blender (we use a basic one like this – Kenwood Stick Blender, or you can manually mash them if you’re desperate!

Add extra lemon juice, water or olive oil to taste, and if it dries out just add a little more oil.

That’s it – easy, quick, and delicious.

Makes 1 large flatbread

1½ hours from start to finish (1 hour rising)

Ingredients

2 cups plain white flour – or strong bread flour

2 tbsp olive oil

1 tsp salt

7-10g dried yeast

3-400ml lukewarm water

3-4 tsps of sesame & cumin seeds

Mix the flour, yeast and salt in a large mixing bowl.

Add the water, bit by bit, mixing the dough with a spoon – not too slowly or you end up with an impenetrable ball of dough that shrugs off any more water. Keep adding water until you have a very soft and almost sloppy dough.

Cover the bowl with a tea towel and put in a warm place to rise for an hour – our kitchen is usually warm enough. Meanwhile, pre-heat the oven to 250°c and put a large baking tray in it to heat up.

When the dough has risen, remove the hot tray from the oven and sprinkle with a little flour. Scrape the dough out of the bowl and straight onto the tray (it’ll be too soft to handle) and gently press into shape.

Quickly spray or brush the loaf with a mixture of cold water and a dash of olive oil then sprinkle with the seeds.

Bake in the middle of the oven for 12 mins, then remove from the oven and brush/spray once more. Bake for a further 5 -8 mins, or until the bread is golden.

If you want a crusty loaf then cool it on a wire rack, but for the genuine Turkish Flatbread soft crust, wrap it in a teatowel.

We love eating it as toasted sandwiches, but it’s also great with our home-made hummus.

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Serves 4 hungry people
25 minutes from start to table
Uses only one pan and cooks on the stovetop

Basic Recipe

1-2tbsp olive oil
1 onion, chopped
2-4 cloves of garlic, chopped
2 tins of beans (whatever you have – kidney, cannelini – even baked beans!)
1 tin chopped tomatoes
1 small tin tomato puree
1-2 cups of stock/wine
100g chorizo (I have some that stores for 4 months)

½tsp dried mixed herbs (or 2 tsp fresh)

And for serving

french bread, or good think slices of our everyday wholemeal bread.

Variations

Exchange the chorizo for any other pork: bacon (smoked preferably), chunks of pork belly, sausages etc.
It’s very easy to hide veg in this recipe so the kids eat it without knowing! Try grating in a carrot or courgette – they’ll never spot it.

Heat the oil in a large pan (we use a non-stick wok). Add the onion, garlic, chorizo and cook gently for 5 minutes while you get the rest of the ingredients ready.

Then add the tomatoes, puree, beans, herbs and enough stock to make sure it’s not too thick.

Simmer for 10-15 minutes until the beans are just soft. Then serve with the bread on the side to clean the bowls!

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This recipe comes from our new Resilient Recipes project, which was inspired by Sharon Astyk‘s book “Independence Days: A Guide to Sustainable Food Storage and Preservation“. It aims to lay out a range of easy, delicious meals that can be made from pantry ingredients in combination with home-grown veg.

The best of these recipes will need little or no cooking, should appeal to all the family, and can be easy everyday meals made from ingredients that can be stored for up to a year. In the event of any form of disruption to the food supply a well prepared family will be able to feed themselves happily from the Resilient Recipes guide.

We’ll start filling it with our favourite resilient recipes, feel free to contact us with yours and we’ll try them out and add them too!

Easy Risotto Recipe

Serves 4 hungry people
45 min from start to table – 25 mins unattended cooking
Only uses one pan & cooks on the stovetop

Basic Recipe

3tbsp olive oil
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves of garlic
300g risotto rice (Arborio)
600ml stock (chicken or vegetable)
150ml white wine (or red! or stock if none available)
300ml passata (or a tin of tomatoes, pureed)
½tsp dried oregano / mixed herbs (or 2 tsp fresh)

and for serving

2 sun-dried tomatoes, sliced
50g black olives, sliced
50g parmesan, shredded

Additions
Mix and match – add one or more of these.
Reduce the quantities if you add more than one.

250g mushrooms, sliced
10g dried porcini mushrooms, rehydrated
100g chorizo, diced
350g chicken, cubed

Heat the oil in a large pan with a lid (we use a non-stick wok with a lid). Add the onion, garlic and any extras you want, other than the porcini mushrooms. Fry, stirring, for about 5 minutes.

Add the rice, stock, wine, passata, herbs and porcini mushrooms and bring to the boil.

Cover, and cook gently for 25 minutes until the liquid is absorbed and the rice is just tender.

Remove from the heat, stir in the olives and sun-dried tomatoes, and serve sprinkled with the parmesan.

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