Steadily firming up the shopping list for our new house – here’s the latest list, with links. 

Kitchen

Dining Room

  • Expandable table

Playroom

  • Instant-heat to stand in front of (Gas?)

Lounge

  • Wood-fired stove
  • Central Pendant light in diffusing shade – 12v CFL?
  • Two Standard/Reading Lamps – 12v CFL?

Garden

  • Kitchen Scraps Compost: Black Soldier Fly Composter / Worm Farm 
  • Firewood store, and at least 12m³ of wood
  • Greenhouse with Aquaponics system

Heating & Hot Water

Power & Light

Water

I have a dream that we can be free from shop-bought tomato purees, passata and pasta sauces. We typically eat one jar of shop-bought sauce each fortnight, plus extra tomato puree into sauces, cassoulets etc. So my target for sauce-self-sufficiency is probably about 26 500ml jars, and then maybe another dozen 100ml jars – so about 15 litres of sauce would be a good target. Apparently 5kg of tomatoes will get you about 4 litres of sauce, so we need to be looking at around 20kg of tomatoes – no small feat, but certainly not enough to trigger a full-on “Doing the Tomatoes” or “National Wog Day“.

To do this properly, you really need a Passata Machine or a Mouli – these will give you the puree without the skins and seeds, and you’ll need some clean, sterilized jars to contain the delicious results.

Making Passata

OK, here’s the process – it seems really easy 🙂 :

  • First, wash the tomatoes,
  • then cut them in half, discarding any bad bits,
  • then simmer them for 20 mins or so – just to start breaking them up
  • pass them through your passata machine or mouli – process the skins 3-4 times to get all the juice out,
  • bottle the passata in sterilized jars
  • heat the jars to complete the seal
  • store for up to year.

Variations

 Once you have the basic passata, there are a range of different things you can do to it before bottling:

Turn it into a complete pasta sauce. Gently fry onions and garlic, add passata and reduce over a low heat until you get to a more traditional pasta sauce consistency. Add some herbs (basil) to the jars before bottling for extra flavour – this is also a good way to “preserve” your garlic and herbs!

Make concentrated tomato paste / puree. Great for flavouring a range of dishes, this can either be made from the plain passata, or from the garlic, onion and herb-flavoured sauce. Essentially you just keep reducing the sauce until you have a thick paste – there is a great description of how to do it here.

For stronger flavours: Oven-roast the tomatoes for about an hour at a low heat instead of boiling them – gives a richer, thicker sauce.

More Inspiration

This whole post was inspired by an off-hand remark by Contadino about his hand-cranked passata machine – go and have a look at the wonderful description and photos on his website – can you believe how many tomatoes he’s grown!

Another wonderful inspiration is the description of “Doing the Tomatoes” on Cream Puffs in Venice – showing the cultural side.

For really detailed descriptions on making passata have a look at Mas du Diable who also has a great page on other ways to preserve tomatoes – I love a good chutney so I need to spend more time looking at that! 

And for more discussion on hand-powered passata machines have a look over at my Gentle Descent blog.

passataJust been reading some great descriptions of how to make Passata, and Pasta Sauces. I’ve long thought that this could be a good way to make the most of our Aquaponic bounty through the long winter months – delicious home-grown-and-made pasta sauces, flavoured with our aquaponic-grown herbs. I think the Mouli that is already on my shopping list would be good at turning our tomatoes into passata while removing all the skins and seeds, but there are also specific Passata Machines – they look sort of like a mincer. The only ones I’ve been able to find in the UK are these red plastic models, sold by Seeds of Italy for £27.50, or Ascott for £25. Apparently you can process over 50kg of tomatoes in them in an hour! They both also sell the preserving jars we’ll need – Ascott seem to have the best range of jars at the best prices – 12 500ml jars for £17.

Not sure whether this makes it onto my list of must-have post-peak-oil kitchen gadgets, or whether I’ll stick with a nice strong metal mouli. Maybe if I can find a more traditional metal Passata machine like the one Contadino uses then I’d be converted . . . I’ll have to look next time I’m on the continent!

OK, so I’ve accepted that we’ll be eating a lot of soup in my peak-oil future. Thats fine, I love a good vegetable soup. But it occurs to me that I do use an electric blender to make it. Here’s a blast of nostalgia though – a Mouli – the original 1940s-designed classic food processor. Vegetables go in, a little bit of elbow grease required, and then puree comes out! We had one of these when I was a kid, and it always seemed kind-of cool. So this makes it onto my Peak-Oil Christmas list – you can get a range of them here – http://www.richmondcookshop.co.uk/index.php?cPath=22_62 and my favourite is the 2-litre stainless steel model – guaranteed to make soup through any global catastrophe.